Saturday, June 11, 2016

Peter Westerhouse - Pre-Civil War Years #2

Peter was naturalized as a United States Citizen 20 November 1855 in Lexington, Missouri, based upon a Lafayette County Courthouse Naturalization Document, transcribed below..

"Peter Westerhouse" a native of Prussia who applies to be admitted a citizen of the United States comes into open court here and proves to the satisfaction of the court here that he has resided in the United States for more than five years and in the State of Missouri at least one year immediately  preceding the application during which time he has conducted himself as a man of good moral character attached to the principles of the constitution of the United States and well disposed to the good order and happenings of the same and the court more over being satisfied that said applicant had taken the preparatory steps required by the laws of the United States concerning the naturalization of foreigners and he the said Peter Westerhouse declaring here in open court upon his oath that he will support the constitution of the United States and that he doth absolutely and entirely renounce and forever all allegiance and fidelity to every foreign power prince potentate State and sovereignty whatever and particularly to the King of Prussia of whom he was late a subject


Therefore the said Peter Westerhouse is admitted a Citizen of the United States

Lafayette County Courthouse Naturalization Document

Peter's and Anna's second child, Mary Anna Westerhouse, was born 28 September 1856, according to her Certificate of Death.

Peter's and Anna's third child, Amelia Westerhouse, was born 1858, based upon the calculated date from the 1860 Federal Census for Lexington, Missouri.  The 1860 Federal Census was the only record ever found for Amelia.

During the same year as Amelia's birth, Peter and Anna purchased property 27 September 1858, located at 319 3rd Street (816 Highland Avenue) in the First Addition section of Lexington for $275.  This property was adjoining Peter's properties to the east on 3rd Street.

Peter and Anna purchased another property 19 January 1859, located at 8 Commerce Street in the First Addition section of Lexington for $75.  This property was behind Peter's 319 3rd Street (816 Highland Avenue) property.

Anderson House Exterior

Wealthy southern plantation slave owners, such as Oliver Anderson, were building large mansions in Missouri during the 1850's.  He moved his family from Nicholasville, Kentucky, to Lexington, Missouri, during 1851.  He went into partnership with his son-in-law, Howard Gratz.  Together, they built a large factory for the processing of hemp into rope.  Oliver also built a mansion high on a bluff overlooking Lexington. This mansion was of Greek Revival style, with large rooms, high ceilings and wide hallways. During 1857, there was an economic downturn which impacted the rope market and caused the financial downfall of Oliver's and Howard's business.  During 1859, they were forced to auction off everything including real estate, personal property, slaves and the Anderson House.  The property surrounding the Anderson House was referred to as The Anderson Addition.   


Anderson House Interior

Peter and Anna purchased six lots of this property which were being auctioned off on 31 December 1859.

The first three wooded lots were located on Poplar Street, North of Delaware Street (Near 406 North 12th Street) in the Anderson Addition of Lexington for $175.  

The last three wooded lots were located on Cedar Street, North of Delaware Street (Near 406 North 12th Street) in the Anderson Addition of Lexington.


1860 Federal Census, Recorded 8 September 1860 in Lexington, Missouri

The Peter Westerhouse family was listed in the 8 September 1860 Federal Census with the Henry Holt-Kamp family and Herman Holt-Kamp.  Herman may have been Anna's father and Henry Holt-Kamp, her brother.  The census listed the occupations for both Peter and Henry as coopers.  The census revealed the value of Peter's real estate as $3,000 and his personal estate as $900.  For Henry, his personal estate was listed as being valued at $300.  The census was recorded at Peter Westerhouse's property, located at 317 3rd Street (824 Highland Avenue) in the First Addition section of Lexington.


Pro-Confederate Antebellum Home on 3rd Street
Peter and Anna purchased property 3 December 1860,  located at 3rd and Plum Streets (324 Highland Avenue) in the Pomeroy, Houx & Grahams Addition section of Lexington for $800.  This property was located along the Missouri River, west of his first property on 3rd Street (Highland Avenue).

This property was located in the Pro-Union, German and Irish working class area of 3rd Street, West of the large Pro-Confederate Antebellum homes.  Local historians believe he would have moved from his cooperage business building at the corner of 3rd Street and Broadway Avenue to this home. 


Peter and Anna purchased another property 8 December 1860, located at 2nd Street, west of Plum Street in the Pomeroy, Houx & Grahams Addition of Lexington for $45.  This property was located along the Missouri River on 2nd Street (Highway 224) and west of Plum Street.


Pro-Union German-Irish Home on 3rd Street

According to Emma Westerhouse Foust's obituary, Peter's and Anna's fourth child was born 2 June 1861.


A map showing the locations of all of Peter's and Anna's properties in Lexington, Missouri is pictured below.


Lexington Missouri Map
A - Peter Westerhouse's First Addition Properties
B - Peter Westerhouse's Anderson Addition Properties 
C - Peter Westerhouse's Pomeroy, Houx & Grahams Addition Properties
D - Lafayette County Courthouse

No comments:

Post a Comment